Exhibit promotion & fundraising

A number of the ideas that have been proposed in order to promote and raise funds for future exhibits including “Twilight of the Dinosaur Age” are listed below...

 

l    Make it a community/regional effort – Cedar Valley Rocks & Minerals Society (CVRMS), Mid-America Paleontology Society (MAPS), Eastern Iowa Paleontology Project (EIPP), US Army Corps of Engineers, UI Geology Dept, UI Museum of Natural History (UIMNH), Science Station, Children’s Museum at Coral Ridge Mall, Burpee Museum, local carpenters, welders, other construction workers/companies, material suppliers, graphic arts companies, school organizations & groups, art classes, local colleges, scout groups, etc.

 

l    Research and follow the lead of area museums that have had their attendance numbers greatly increase after establishing dinosaur exhibits in recent years; in particular “Dinosphere” at the Indianapolis Children’s Museum; the “Jane” exhibit at the Burpee Museum of Natural History in Rockford, IL; and the “Sue” and “Evolving Planet” and “Dinosaurs: Ancient Fossils, New Discoveries” exhibits at the Field Museum in Chicago, IL.

 

l    Make it clear this is a new effort to establish new exhibits with new names to maximize likelihood that local and regional media will respond to news releases.

 

l    Think BIG, but be prepared to downsize based on funding.

 

l    “Laura the Kid Dinosaur” has become Iowa’s Celebrity Dinosaur!

       (e.g. Rockford, IL and “Jane the Juvenile T.rex” includes signage into city, promos in literature from local Chamber of Commerce & local businesses).

 

l    “Laura” merchandising (name/logo/artwork) -- t-shirts, hats, plush toys, pens, pencils, magnets, stickers, coffee mugs, glasses, sweatshirts, backpacks, etc.

 

l    Ongoing fundraising to include exhibit admission, sales of artwork posters, “Laura” replicas, Peck’s Rex replicas, assorted dinosaur merchandise, and gift certificates for exhibit admission/gift shop.

 

l    Individuals, Corporations, and school and scout groups can sponsor a bone of “Laura” (e.g. skull $25,000; femur $10,000; metatarsal $1000; tail bone $25).

 

l    Sponsors have many benefits based on level of giving – e.g. free “Laura” replicas (dentary; skull); museum membership; admission to exclusive behind-the-scenes programs; discounts on merchandise and educational programs fees; etc.  Sponsors recognized on plaques within exhibits.  Large donors can have their names in exhibit titles, or be name-plate sponsors of sections within exhibits.

 

l    Seek out volunteers!  Preparators, educators, docents, discovery center helpers, etc.

 

l    Make sure exhibits are accessible to ALL (“Free Tuesdays,” some free educational programs, budget family membership category).

 

l    Have contests for school children: “Iowa’s Celebrity Dinosaur Needs a New Name,” “Draw ‘Laura the Kid Dinosaur,’” and “Tell a Story About ‘Laura the Kid Dinosaur.’”

 

l    Fossil Prep Lab with “Laura, Dinosaur Under Construction” is a MUST (visitors return to see progress on preparation of “Laura” and other fossils).

 

l    Educational programming (lectures, workshops, films) that focuses on various exhibit topics.

 

l    Maintain address/email list of interested persons to send out updates.

 

l    Maintain a website to promote exhibits and educate the public.

Introduction

Laura

Exhibits

Promotion

Sponsors

Fossil Guy

Events

Contact Us

Eastern Iowa Paleontology Project

“Bringing DINOSAURS to Iowa”

www.paleoproject.org

The EIPP logo will be used to promote the project and “Laura the Kid Dinosaur.”

The portable informational display for the Eastern Iowa Paleontology Project introduces readers to the project, “Laura the Kid Dinosaur”, and future plans.

Young EIPP Sponsors plaster jacket a fossil duckbill femur in the badlands of SW North Dakota (July 2007).

A diagram of the skeleton of “Laura the Kid Dinosaur” was prepared by EIPP President Don Johnson after careful measurement of her fossil bones.

Click here to learn more about Roby Braun’s 1:4 scale life restoration of “Laura the Kid Dinosaur”!

The duckbills were a diverse group of plant-eating dinosaurs that had a battery of teeth in each jaw. 

Young EIPP Sponsors show off the fruits of their labor at Paleofest ‘08 in Rockford, IL.